• Marie Losier - Hello Happiness!

    OFFICIAL RELEASE JUNE 4, 2018!!! 

    DVD available for pre-sale at a discounted price!

    Marie Losier’s movies are as sweet and sassy as her name and well worth a gander or goose by all off beat cineastes. So beat off to a different drum and marvel at the wad of wonders that only a French woman could generate. Take a trip down a sprocketed spiral of celluloid strips into a glory hole of impressive dimensions. What pops through will surely enlarge with persistent, ocular manipulation. -George Kuchar

  • Sins of the Fleshapoids

    Along with Anger's Scorpio Rising and Warhol's Chelsea Girls, Mike Kuchar's Sins of the Fleshapoids remains one of the most influential films of the '60s American Underground. Mike and his brother George (who co-wrote Fleshapoids), were the godfathers of bargain basement cinema, pioneering a hilariously campy, lurid style between Ed Wood exploitation and Douglas Sirk melodrama.

    - Director’s Commentary
    - Booklet featuring Jack Stevenson’s interview with Kuchar

  • Patrick Bokanowski - L'ANGE, UN RÊVE SOLAIRE & COURTS MÉTRAGES

    RELEASE DATE : JAN 31st 2018

    -------

    L’ANGE 1977-1982, 35mm, new restored version 2016, scan 2K, color, Stereo, 70’

    BONUS « Un créateur de l’imaginaire : Patrick Bokanowski - collection Hiéroglyphes Réalisateur : Jean-Claude Lubtchansky  ©INA 1975 » + « Un créateur de l’imaginaire - collection Ciné-Court - Réalisateur : Jean-Claude Lubtchansky  ©INA 1977 » + Interview Michèle Bokanowski extrait de « Court-circuit n°180 » Réalisateur : Lorenzo Recio 

    -------

    UN RÊVE SOLAIRE 2016, HD video, color, 63’

    BONUS Genèse de « Un Rêve Solaire », a film by Pip Chodorov, 2017, HD video, color, 7’

  • Slow Mirror

    The DVD features 4 surrealist films by the Buharov Bros., among which their feature film "Slow Mirror."

    "The anarchic, fractured and extremely surreal lms by Ivan and Igor Buharov (Kornél Szilágyi and Nándor Hevesi) might seem a perfect t for this “outsider” paradigm. Darkly playful hallucinations that share the aura of having been discovered forgotten in someone’s granny’s attic like a book of now troubling childhood drawings, they reveal in precise terms a world perhaps subconsciously suspected but hitherto indescribable. They have in common an improvised quality and a sense of the homemade. This not only stems from their beautifully rough-hewn visual textures but often from the people, objects and spaces that appear before the camera. The casts are composed of extraordinary ordinary people rather than film star types: lived-in faces bringing their own stories to the films. The props, which sometimes conspicuously reappear in different films, can likewise seem to have a real-world existence of their own carried over into the picture. This helps lend the films the weird intimacy of children’s games, in which familiar people and places are made alien and the weirdly alien becomes immanent to the everyday. The feverish and disorienting experience of watching a Buharov film was probably best described in the 2008 Offscreen Film Festival catalogue as “getting lost in someone else’s dream."  -Maximilian Le Cain